Categories ArchivesUncategorized

What’s That on my Foot?

By Dr. Jaya Rajagopalan, DPM Have you noticed a new black spot that has popped up on your foot in between the toes or under a nail? Or a growth on the top or bottom of the foot that seems to be growing quickly? What is it? Well….let’s talk spots! Specifically: colorful ones. Skin lesions are very common and usually benign. However, our physicians at SWAFAC recommend having all suspicious skin changes on the foot and ankle examined. New black spots are often simple moles. These are caused by a buildup of melanin within deep layers of the skin, causing the color change. However, they could actually be a form of skin cancer known as melanoma, a potentially life-threatening form ...



Continue Reading

Peripheral Neuropathy

By Mark Whitesides, DPM Have you ever experienced these symptoms? Burning in your feet? Electricity shooting down your leg to your foot? Electric pain you feel only in your feet? A numbing sensation in your feet? These are some of the symptoms that our patients at the Southwest Austin Foot and Ankle Clinic often describe to our podiatric physicians. The most common diagnosis associated with these symptoms is peripheral neuropathy. Peripheral neuropathy is the disease of nerves that stem from the central nervous system. The central nervous system is composed of the brain and spinal cord. The peripheral nerves include feet, ankles, and toes.  Peripheral neuropathy can occur from many different disease processes: Diabetes: It is believed that excess sugar ...



Continue Reading

Plantar Warts: You Didn’t Step on a Frog!

By Dr. Kim L. Dao You may have experienced a lesion to the foot and have wondered whether it was a callus, or worse, a wart! Where did it come from? Contrary to popular belief and legend, warts do not come from contact to frogs. Warts are caused by Human Papilloma Virus (HPV). They are contagious and can spread through direct contact. Warts have their own blood supply, which cause tiny black dots within the lesion. These represent the oxidized ends of tiny blood vessels, and will typically bleed from shaving down the wart, which your podiatrist will do as part of treatment as discussed below. Warts tend to form on the bottom of the feet, causing pain with pressure ...



Continue Reading

“It’s just a broken toe!” Let’s talk about that.

By Dr. Mark Whitesides If you have ever injured your toe and felt (or heard!) a snap, you may have wondered if your toe was broken! Ouch! You might have been given the conventional advice that “there is nothing you can do for a broken toe” and decided that your injured toe was not a big deal. Often, folks decide that a “wait and see” approach is the best course of action. However, a toe fracture that goes undetected and untreated can lead to complications. You may have significant soft tissue injuries or a fracture of a larger bone further up in your foot. When it comes to broken toes, significant infection risk happens if the skin on the affected ...



Continue Reading

Diabetes, Holidays, and Your Feet

By Dr. Mark Whitesides The holidays are often a time of sweet foods and treats. If you are living with diabetes, it can be difficult to avoid these things at this time of the year! You are not alone. According to the CDC, there are over 34 million people in the US living with diabetes. And some of most common problems with diabetes involve the feet. Diabetes can affect the blood flow into legs and feet, called peripheral vascular disease. It can also affect the nerves to the lower extremities, causing numbness. This is called peripheral neuropathy. These disease processes can both lead to ulcers, which are wounds that do not heal normally. This is why a podiatrist is an ...



Continue Reading

Hallux Rigidus, or “Big Toe Arthritis”

By: Dr. Vanatius Babila Tita I remember telling a younger active patient that she had hallux rigidus, or “big toe arthritis” and her response was one I hear often when discussing arthritis: “Isn’t that like something that happens when you are older?” Well, the answer is “no.” Hallux rigidus, like most other arthritis, does not have a clear cause, but it has been attributed overuse, injuries, genetics, osteoarthritis, and even rheumatoid arthritis. Having hallux rigidus does not mean that you are at higher risk for developing other arthritis in other joints such as your hips or knees. The symptoms of hallux rigidus include joint pain, stiffness, swelling, and prominent bone spur formation. The condition is progressive and can get worst ...



Continue Reading

The Disease of Kings

By Dr. Michelle Vi Nguyen Ah, it must be good to be king: insurmountable wealth, gorgeous castles, lavish meals, and gout. Wait, what? – Yes, gout! Gout was historically deemed the “disease of kings” because it was associated with an opulent lifestyle. The onset of symptoms seemed to correlate with overindulgence of food and alcohol, a diet that only kings enjoyed. It was one of King Henry VIII’s lifetime companions, as if six wives were not enough! These days, we understand gout occurs when there is an accumulation of uric acid in a joint. Everyone produces uric acid. Approximately 2/3 of uric acid is made in our bodies naturally and the remaining 1/3 we consume in the form of purines. ...



Continue Reading

Forefoot Pain: Could It Be Your Plantar Plate?

By: Dr. Jaya Rajagopalan Do you love wearing high heels and sometimes too-tight shoes?And does that sometimes make your forefoot hurt? A lot? Forefoot pain is a common condition that causes problems for many people. There are many common conditions associated with the pain in the forefoot, including bunions, hammer toes, neuromas, and more. One less known aggravator is the plantar plate injury. Forefoot pain can present as a burning sensation, aching, or throbbing. It often feels worse with activities such as yoga. It can also feel like a pebble is under your foot. Sometimes, the little toes will even “float” or “sit up” in comparison to the rest of its compadres. Over time, the toe may even drift to ...



Continue Reading

The Achilles Heel

By: Dr. Kim L. Dao We’ve heard of the mythological definition of the Achilles Heel: The idiomatic weakness or vulnerability that brings about a hero’s downfall. Anatomically, the Achilles tendon is an area that can be prone to injury ranging from tendinitis to a full-blown rupture. The Achilles tendon is a thick cord as the muscles of the calf converge and connect to the back of the calcaneus or heel bone. This particular structure is easily injured in those who are active, especially in high-impact sports such as running and basketball. You may have heard of athletes who have been placed on the injured list due to Achilles tendinitis or rupture (partially or completely). Most notably: Kevin Durant during his ...



Continue Reading

Skin Cancer… on your FEET?

By: Dr. Michelle Vi Nguyen Holy Moly, it’s summer already! May is Skin Cancer Prevention month and now that it’s officially sandal season, it is time to get our feet ready for some fun in the sun. Do you always remember to put sunscreen on your feet? Skin cancers can occur anywhere, so we must be just as diligent in protecting the skin of our feet as everywhere else on our body.   Don’t Be Fooled! Skin cancers are infamous for being great mimickers. For example, Basal cell and squamous cell carcinomas can be mistaken for warts and blisters. Melanoma can appear as moles and freckles on the feet. If you notice a lesion on your foot that is undergoing ...



Continue Reading

This is a unique website which will require a more modern browser to work!

Please upgrade today!